Using Our Doubt as a Catalyst for Courage

By Casey Hilty

God's Brave Women - Casey's Story


There’s a bit of irony happening behind the scenes of my post for the Brave Women Series. I don’t feel very brave.


When I hear other women share about their courageous moments, I am hesitant to share mine. Perhaps I need a little bravery to write about being brave.


While many people fight through extrinsic hardships and physical challenges, my battles come from my own insecurities, from fear of letting people down, from not being good enough, fear of making a mistake. Funnily enough, God has called me to a career which pits my fears against every word I write, everything I paint, every thought I speak, and every note I sing.


"God has called me to a career which pits my fears against every word I write, everything I paint, every thought I speak, and every note I sing."


I fell in love with music at a young age. I enjoyed singing and got my first violin in second grade. I’d practice for hours after school, not in preparation for the next performance or competition, but because I genuinely enjoyed playing. For me, it wasn’t about the stage—in fact, that was one of the reasons I walked away from music at the age of 17.


It wasn’t my idea to sing a solo at the Christmas pep rally. I stood in front of a microphone wearing a cheerleading uniform and a Santa hat before hundreds of students, teachers, and parents. My team had retreated to the bleachers and I was alone on the gym floor.


Rule number 1 for any singer: dont hold your breath.

I held my breath.


At that moment, I understood where the term “knee-knocking” came from as my legs wouldn’t stop shaking. I sang my first solo, “Silver Bells,” like a reindeer in headlights. Perhaps that’s also where the term “sheepish” came from b