Walking Out Brave in Our Everyday Lives

By Ronne Rock

God's Brave Women - Ronne's Story


It looks different for all of us, doesn't it?


I used to think bravery was comprised of big, bold, audacious steps that would cause the earth beneath my feet to quake. I've learned so much over the years about the mountain-moving power of trembling knees or how brave it is to carefully navigate the darkness just to follow the smallest sliver of light.


"I've learned so much over the years about the mountain-moving power of trembling knees or how brave it is to carefully navigate the darkness just to follow the smallest sliver of light."


Now, I’ll not lie. There have been big bold steps in my life. There was the Sunday morning I packed everything I could into a friend’s Plymouth Arrow and fled a thorny situation with my precious baby boy in tow. There was no real plan for the days ahead, but there was a fortitude within my soul that I knew was God’s own breath filling my lungs as I prepared for the journey.


I packed that boy up a few years later and moved to a new state and a new career in a newly formed management position at a television station. This time the boldness found itself not only in proving out my qualifications to be in that new role, but in figuring out childcare and finding the best place to live and the best church to attend so that boy could thrive.


And then, there was the leap from the comfort and benefits of a career in marketing television shows and perfect evenings of entertainment for the family to marketing the beauty of community and the power of a simple “yes” to the sponsorship of a child, or an act of service for the orphaned and vulnerable. Gone are the days of perks and pay raises and performance bonuses. But the boldness that was there more than a decade ago when marketing became ministry remains.


Yes, brave can be bold and audacious.


But I have learned that brave is far more often found in the quiet, live-to-breathe-another-day decisions that don’t feel powerful at all.


Sometimes, brave is the next step we take in what seems to be an endless list of next steps.


"But I have learned that brave is far more often found in the quiet, live-to-breathe-another-day decisions that don’t feel powerful at all. Sometimes, brave is the next step we take in what seems to be an endless list of next steps."

It’s celebrating your kid’s last day of school with gusto (as your heart catches in your throat while the unanswered “what next” questions mount). It’s yet one more job application or talk with a recruiter or cup of coffee with a potential client or boss (as you battle the internal voice that calls into question your value and worth). It’s choosing to still believe after listening to reports from doctors or counselors or therapists that always wrap confidence in conditions (as your weary soul waits and wonders).


Sometimes, brave is the thing we do in secret long before we take the public step. It’s learning to pray again after a season of silence and doubt. It’s letting our heart be reshaped by brokenness as we reach out to reconcile. It’s offering up the work of our hands to critique before we offer it up to the world. It’s speaking even if our voice trembles, and it’s knowing when presence is far more important than words could ever be.


Sometimes, brave is simply the thing we do right now, even as fear yells to us that we’re not ready—and we never will be.


"Sometimes, brave is simply the thing we do right now, even as fear yells to us that we’re not ready—and we never will be."


What I have learned about true bravery is this: it is resolute. Now, I’m not talking about resolute as in sheer boot-strapping determination. No, there are deeper definitions to the word—and those definitions are what makes it such a beautiful description of brave.


To be brave is to be steadfast.

“So, my dear brothers and sisters, be strong and immovable. Always work enthusiastically for the Lord, for you know that nothing you do for the Lord is ever useless.”

(1 Corinthians 15:58)


Bravery is simply keeping the main thing the main thing in the midst of a thousand flirting invitations that diminish the beauty of what we have been given. It is being steadfast with the days, and not demeaning the purposeful work of filling the space we’ve been given.


"Bravery is simply keeping the main thing the main thing in the midst of a thousand flirting invitations that diminish the beauty of what we have been given. It is being steadfast with the days, and not demeaning the purposeful work of filling the space we’ve been given."


To be brave is to be undaunted.


“So, here’s what I’ve learned through it all: Leave all your cares and anxieties at the feet of the Lord, and measureless grace will strengthen you.”

(Psalm 55:22)


One of the greatest qualities I've been taught from women leaders around the world is to not allow discouragement to take root in the days of hardships, difficult decisions, and in the seasons where things are simply mundane or just stuck. There is value in taking a breath and taking time to reflect so that my life becomes a response rather than a reaction.


To be brave is to loosen our grip.